Tiebreaks Explained

Last Updated: September 17th, 2009 by Daniel Rensch

U.S.C.F. recommended order for the “Tie-Break” system:

  1. Opposition Cumulative
    The Cumulative score of your opponents is tallied to help determine, once again, the general strength of your opposition.
  2. Solkoff
    The Solkoff System is the same as the Modified Median except that no opponent’s scores are discarded.
  3. Cumulative
    To determine a player’s Cumulative Tie-Breaks a TD will simply keep a running score for each round. For example, if a player’s results were win, loss, win, draw, and loss the wall chart would show a Cumulative running score of 1,1,2,2.5,2.5. The total Cumulative Tie-Break for this player would be 9 (1+1+2+2.5+2.5=9). If another player who scored 2.5 had a wall chart that read: 1,2,2.5,2.5,2.5, the tie break points scored would be 10.5 (1+2+2.5+2.5+2.5=10.5). The latter player’s Tie-Breaks are higher because he or she won earlier, and presumably had tougher opposition throughout the event.
  4. Opposition Cumulative
    The Cumulative score of your opponents is tallied to help determine, once again, the general strength of your opposition.

Note:

Above is a general overview of the most commonly used Tie-Breaks in all U.S.C.F. tournaments. The system is only used to help the Tournament Director determine, in the event that players have the same total score at the end of the tournament, who deserves which trophy. For example, all players that may tie for a certain place in the standings have the right to think of themselves as tied for that particular place, even though they may be given a lower trophy because of their Tie Breaks. For questions, please ask the TD.